The Jumblies from Pomagranate Spring 2010



Pomegranate Reintroduces the Mssrs Edward Lear and Gorey

The 2010 Spring season has Pomegranate releasing not one, but three Edward Gorey titles: The Jumblies, The Dong with the Luminous Nose, both by Edward Lear, and The Wuggly Ump and Other Delights, an Edward Gorey Coloring Book, a Pomegranate Kids title.

Edward Lear originally published The Jumblies, in Nonsense Songs, Stories, Botany, and Alphabets in 1871. The Dong with the Luminous Nose appeared six years later, in Laughable Lyrics: A Fresh Book of Nonsense Poems, Songs, Botany, etc. in 1877. Mr. Lear originally drew only one illustration for each story. Both have been reprinted several times since, with illustrations by such notable artists like Leslie Brooks (Warne, 1900) and John Vernon Lord (Harmony, 1986). But even among these, Gorey’s work appears the most unique, refreshing and inspired.

A trait found in Gorey’s more memorable works is the effortless flow between the story and art; a well-choreographed dance of meter and line. It's found in spades here in both The Jumblies and The Dong.... Gorey's inspired interpretation of The Jumblies does something to Lear’s original - it releases the story from words, engaging as they are. Gorey gives us readers the hi-ho-the-merry-o amidst the wind and the waves, the clanking of bottles and tiny cheers of celebration. And even if the Jumblies aren’t beings made entirely in our image, they still provide us the most enjoyable of company.



In The Dong with the Luminous Nose, sweet pathos is offered alongside humor, and Gorey gives the poor, tortured soul a real stage. Other artists portray the Dong succumbing to a sort of mad foolishness. Gorey finds someone not so mad, but forlorn, more a fool of the heart.

Together, these endearing little characters cast in The Jumblies and The Dong… come through with a warmth and fragility that makes these little players appear, oddly, as old, wizened children. They are some of Gorey's most memorable creations. Not surprising really, as Gorey held Lear in very high esteem, and hoped he could do Lear’s tales justice.

The third book, a color-me version of The Wuggly Ump [1963], together with a handful of various illustrations, is a brilliant idea, and fits very nicely with the other two books. There are twenty-two images to color. Each illustration has a small, original color version printed on the inside of the front and back covers, for reference. Each full-page black-line drawing is printed on one side of a page only, so each can be cut and mounted. For those not yet acquainted with The Wuggly Ump, whose namesake is very Lear-ish, it is a cautionary tale with a Hilaire Belloc-like texture. But truly, the prospect of creating a personalized version of the Wuggly Ump sounds like so much fun! All the pen and ink detail is still there; simply begging to be re-faced (hopefully not de-faced). Break out the colored pencils or the long-neglected watercolor kits.


One of the Other Delights in 'Wuggly Ump Coloring Book'



The Jumblies
Text by Edward Lear; illustrated by Edward Gorey
48 pages with 22 black-and-white illustrations
Smyth-sewn casebound book with jacket
Size: 8 ˝ x 6 inches
ISBN 978-0-7649-5426-9
$14.95

The Dong with a Luminous Nose
Text by Edward Lear; illustrated by Edward Gorey
48 pages with 22 black-and-white illustrations
Smyth-sewn casebound book with jacket
Size: 8 ˝ x 6 inches
ISBN 978-0-7649-5427-6
$14.95

The Wuggly Ump and Other Delights Coloring Book
48 pages with 22 black-and-white illustrations
Gloss wrappers with staple binding
Size: 8 ˝ x 11 inches
ISBN 978-0-7649-5346-0
This book is CPSIA compliant
$7.95